Modern Bondage: 30 million people enslaved worldwide

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The Voice Of Russia

A new index on modern day slavery says that nearly 30 million people live as slaves worldwide. Most of them forced to be child brides, prostitutes, home chattels or laborers.

The Australian-based Walk-Free Foundation investigated 162 cases for its study, ‘the Global Slavery Index’ and found people living in modern bondage in every one of them.

According to the survey, some 29.8 million people have been trafficked for labor or sex work globally, three quarters of them in China, India, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Thailand, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Myanmar, Mauritania, and Bangladesh.

The human rights organization ranked the nations in order of prevalence of modern slavery per head of population.

Mauritania is home to the majority of modern slaves who are often born into hereditary slavery, while others are captured or kidnapped before being sold or kept for exploitation, whether through marriage, unpaid labor or as domestic workers.

There are said to be 209,000 slaves in Haiti while in Pakistan and india there it’s thought some 2.1 million and 14.7 million people respectively are enslaved.

Many victims are lured into slavery with false promises of a good job and find themselves entrapped and unable to escape.

The research showed that despite rule of law and police oversight, rich countries too are involved in human trafficking. For example, the UK’s Guardian published a report on slavery in September, where it revealed that at least one construction worker dies every day on Qatari building sites ahead of the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Most are Nepalese according to the Guardian which cited the Nepalese Embassy in Doha, at least 44 of them died between June 4 and August 8.

Qatar uses the so-called “kafala” system, under which each foreign worker needs a sponsor, usually their employer, who grants their workers permission to enter or leave the country, or to change jobs. The company is also responsible for issuing IDs, without which workers are reduced to the status of foreign aliens with no legal protection.

This system leaves migrant workers at the mercy of their employers, who can withhold documents and refuse to pay wages.